1360343835686 080a51bd76bbd6cb2a84ffed3ab06d84

Electron Microprobe Laboratory

Boulder, Colorado, US

An electron microprobe is an electron microscope designed for the non-destructive x-ray microanalysis and imaging of solid materials. It is capable of high spatial resolution (1 micron beam size) and relatively high analytical sensitivity. The analytical facilities' JEOL JXA-8600 can acquire digital secondary-electron and backscattered-electron images as well as elemental x-ray maps. It is equipped with 4 wavelength-dispersive spectrometers and an energy-dispersive spectrometer. Most of the periodic table can in principle be analyzed (Be through U), subject to several important considerations.

The quality of analyses performed depends essentially on the quality of sample preparation, character of the sample material, and availability of appropriate primary and secondary calibration standards for the desired elements. A precision usually less than 0.5% relative depending on element abundance, and accuracy as good... Show more »

An electron microprobe is an electron microscope designed for the non-destructive x-ray microanalysis and imaging of solid materials. It is capable of high spatial resolution (1 micron beam size) and relatively high analytical sensitivity. The analytical facilities' JEOL JXA-8600 can acquire digital secondary-electron and backscattered-electron images as well as elemental x-ray maps. It is equipped with 4 wavelength-dispersive spectrometers and an energy-dispersive spectrometer. Most of the periodic table can in principle be analyzed (Be through U), subject to several important considerations.

The quality of analyses performed depends essentially on the quality of sample preparation, character of the sample material, and availability of appropriate primary and secondary calibration standards for the desired elements. A precision usually less than 0.5% relative depending on element abundance, and accuracy as good as 1-2% can be obtained with this instrument.

The analytical sensitivity ranges from a low of ~50 parts per million for optimum cases, to a typical detection limit of several hundred ppm, but can be as high as several weight percent for problem elements. The volume sampled is typically a few cubic microns, corresponding to a weight of a few picograms.

« Show less

Electron Microprobe Laboratory has not listed any services.

Electron Probe Microanalysis
Starting at $60.00 per hour

Quantitative analysis of solid material using wavelength dispersive spectrometry (WDS). Price applies to researchers that are funded through research grants. For corporate: please, contact us.

Analytical Capabilities

Our microprobe is nominally capable of analyzing a wide range of elements (from Be through U), at... Show more »

Quantitative analysis of solid material using wavelength dispersive spectrometry (WDS). Price applies to researchers that are funded through research grants. For corporate: please, contact us.

Analytical Capabilities

Our microprobe is nominally capable of analyzing a wide range of elements (from Be through U), at concentrations typically above 100 parts per million. This instrument has very good electronic and analytical stability, vacuum cleanliness, and capability to perform analyses with high precision and accuracy as demonstrated by a history of applications. The volume excited by the electron beam is a few cubic micron (depending on material density), corresponding to a sample size of a few picograms. The primary advantage of microprobe analysis is that the analysis is non-destructive, although some material must be consumed in making a polished mount, and that a very small amount of material is sampled for a measurement. It is the ideal technique for analyzing crystals that are zoned, or samples that are made up of intimately-mixed phases where one needs to spatially resolve the phases being studied. The analytical sensitivity does depend on the matrix of other elements present, and the material properties of the compound to be analyzed.

Imaging Capabilities

Digital imaging (secondary-electron or backscattered-electron) and x-ray element mapping can be acquired using the Geller dPict software. This program allows one to simultaneously acquire wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive x-ray maps as well as secondary-electron or backscattered-electron images. X-ray maps can be acquired at a full 16-bit count resolution, which enables a large dynamic count range to be sampled. Two basic x-ray mapping modes are available, digital mapping, which is essentially a multiple-scan averaging mode that produces a binary image based on x-ray detection at each pixel (i.e. a noise suppressed dot-mapping technique), and counter-mode mapping, which is a slower but higher resolution pixel-by-pixel map acquisition mode. The digital mapping mode allow for relatively fast acquisition to discriminate phases with large chemical difference, whereas the counter-mode mapping is a slower acquisition to discriminate phases with smaller chemical difference.

Digital images are saved in TIFF format, and can be printed out on either the Optra S1250 or an HP 970 CSE color inkjet printer. Image processing can be perfomed using dPict, ImagePro (Media Cybernetics), or Photoshop (Adobe). The dPict program has several advanced capabilities, like mosaic images using relative registration, so that images collected manually can be combined to form a mosaic master image.

Equipment:
Jeol JXA-8600
PGT Avalon energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS)
Geller dPict x-ray analyzer

« Show less
Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy
Starting at $60.00 per hour

Qualitative analysis using EDS. Price applies to researchers that are funded through research grants. For corporate: please, contact us.

Analytical Capabilities

Our microprobe is nominally capable of analyzing a wide range of elements (from Be through U), at concentrations typically above 100 parts per million. This... Show more »

Qualitative analysis using EDS. Price applies to researchers that are funded through research grants. For corporate: please, contact us.

Analytical Capabilities

Our microprobe is nominally capable of analyzing a wide range of elements (from Be through U), at concentrations typically above 100 parts per million. This instrument has very good electronic and analytical stability, vacuum cleanliness, and capability to perform analyses with high precision and accuracy as demonstrated by a history of applications. The volume excited by the electron beam is a few cubic micron (depending on material density), corresponding to a sample size of a few picograms. The primary advantage of microprobe analysis is that the analysis is non-destructive, although some material must be consumed in making a polished mount, and that a very small amount of material is sampled for a measurement. It is the ideal technique for analyzing crystals that are zoned, or samples that are made up of intimately-mixed phases where one needs to spatially resolve the phases being studied. The analytical sensitivity does depend on the matrix of other elements present, and the material properties of the compound to be analyzed.

Imaging Capabilities

Digital imaging (secondary-electron or backscattered-electron) and x-ray element mapping can be acquired using the Geller dPict software. This program allows one to simultaneously acquire wavelength-dispersive and energy-dispersive x-ray maps as well as secondary-electron or backscattered-electron images. X-ray maps can be acquired at a full 16-bit count resolution, which enables a large dynamic count range to be sampled. Two basic x-ray mapping modes are available, digital mapping, which is essentially a multiple-scan averaging mode that produces a binary image based on x-ray detection at each pixel (i.e. a noise suppressed dot-mapping technique), and counter-mode mapping, which is a slower but higher resolution pixel-by-pixel map acquisition mode. The digital mapping mode allow for relatively fast acquisition to discriminate phases with large chemical difference, whereas the counter-mode mapping is a slower acquisition to discriminate phases with smaller chemical difference.

Digital images are saved in TIFF format, and can be printed out on either the Optra S1250 or an HP 970 CSE color inkjet printer. Image processing can be perfomed using dPict, ImagePro (Media Cybernetics), or Photoshop (Adobe). The dPict program has several advanced capabilities, like mosaic images using relative registration, so that images collected manually can be combined to form a mosaic master image.

Equipment:
Jeol JXA-8600
PGT Avalon energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS)
Geller dPict x-ray analyzer

« Show less
Spectroscopy
Price on request
Request a quote for more information about this service.
Imaging & Spectroscopy
Price on request
Request a quote for more information about this service.
Chemistry and Materials
Price on request
Request a quote for more information about this service.
Chemical Engineering and Processing
Price on request
Request a quote for more information about this service.
Ask A Question Find what you're looking for? If not, you can ask this lab a question:
2016-06-21 00:30:50 +0100

Net Promoter Score of 10 received for Electron Probe Microanalysis.

Additional Ratings: satisfaction with deliverable: 10, satisfaction with timeliness: 9.
September 18, 2015

Positive review received for Electron Probe Microanalysis:

"The electron microprobe analysis done by Dr. Julien Allaz on the archaeological specimen I sent to him was outstanding. He went above and beyond in his petrographic analysis to make sure all contingencies were covered. He solved the problem I challenged him with. His extensive geological knowledge, experience and the capability of the microprobe in his hands clearly showed through. I highly recommend his work with the electron microprobe and geological analysis of any sort. Archaeologists should learn what he has to offer in the scientific study of certain types of artifacts. Jeffrey Goodman, Ph.D. MBA Archeological Research Books"

March 18, 2013

Positive review received for Electron Probe Microanalysis:

"Julien was extremely professional and very prompt. The results were provided on time and as promised. The equipment employed was state of the art. Overall an excellent experience. Thank you."

Be the first to endorse Electron Microprobe Laboratory

Endorse this lab